A New Wind Chill Chart
Kirt's Cogitations™ #118

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A New Wind Chill Chart
It has been said that the only thing constant in this world is change, and now even the familiar old wind chill chart has been revamped. The old formula for the chart was derived in the 1940s by a method that noted the length of time required for a bottle of water to freeze under a variety of wind speeds and air temperatures. Since little was known about the thermal transfer properties of skin at the time, the chosen plastic container skewed the results. The old chart yielded a wind chill factor that was too low - by tens of degrees Fahrenheit in extreme cases. Using modern methods that involve bringing the skin of human volunteers to near freezing, a new formula - and new chart - was born in the year 2000. An example: A 20 °F day with 10 mph wind, now has a wind-chill rating of 9 °F instead of 3 °F.

A huge collection of my 'Factoids' can be accessed from my 'Kirt's Cogitations' table of contents.

Topical Smorgasbord, another manifestation of Factoids, are be found on these pages:

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 |
| 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 |

All pertain to topics that are related to the general engineering and science theme of RF Cafe.