Now That's Cold!
Kirt's Cogitations™ #160

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Now That's Cold!

The coldest spot on Earth is at the Vostok Ice Station in Antartica, where in 1989 the temperature was measured to be -128.6 F (-89.2 C). At that temperature, water would freeze before hitting the ground when poured from table height. To the other extreme, a high temperature of +136 F (57.8 C) was recorded in El Azizia, Libya, in 1922. At an altitude of 50 miles above the two equators, temps of -220 F (-140 C) are common. In the Earth's inner core, temps can reach +13,000 F (7,200 C), which is hotter that the surface of the sun.

A huge collection of my 'Factoids' can be accessed from my 'Kirt's Cogitations' table of contents.

Topical Smorgasbord, another manifestation of Factoids, are be found on these pages:

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 |
| 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 |

All pertain to topics that are related to the general engineering and science theme of RF Cafe.