The Next Assembly Line Robot - Antifreeze
Kirt's Cogitations™ #183

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The Next Assembly Line Robot - Antifreeze

Antifreeze now has a new use. Scientists at the University of Minnesota have discovered a way to exploit the surface tensions properties of ethylene glycol to cause pairs of components with complementary shapes to be attracted to each other and self-assemble. In an experiment, hundreds of LED chips and silicon carriers were mixed in a container of ethylene glycol, heated, and then shaken to cause the complementary LED/carrier shapes to mate while in the mixture. The system was then heated to a temperature that allowed solder dollops in the carriers to melt and make a connection to the LED die pads. After cooling and rinsing, the assembled parts were removed and inspected. 600 assemblies were produced in just two minutes - a 100% yield! A second and final similar step then assembled the LED/carrier pairs onto a surface-mount package and yielded 97%. This process is being considered for similar high volume manufacturing operations that involve parts too small to be efficiently handled with robotic or human means.

A huge collection of my 'Factoids' can be accessed from my 'Kirt's Cogitations' table of contents.

Topical Smorgasbord, another manifestation of Factoids, are be found on these pages:

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 |
| 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 |

All pertain to topics that are related to the general engineering and science theme of RF Cafe.