Electronics World articles Popular Electronics articles QST articles Radio & TV News articles Radio-Craft articles Radio-Electronics articles Short Wave Craft articles Wireless World articles Google Search of RF Cafe website Sitemap Electronics Equations Mathematics Equations Equations physics Manufacturers & distributors Engineer Jobs LinkedIn Crosswords Engineering Humor Kirt's Cogitations RF Engineering Quizzes Notable Quotes Calculators Education Engineering Magazine Articles Engineering software RF Cafe Archives RF Cascade Workbook 2018 RF Symbols for Visio - Word Advertising Magazine Sponsor RF Cafe RF Electronics Symbols for Visio RF Electronics Symbols for Office Word RF Electronics Stencils for Visio Sponsor Links Saturday Evening Post NEETS EW Radar Handbook Microwave Museum About RF Cafe Aegis Power Systems Anritsu Alliance Test Equipment Amplifier Solutions Anatech Electronics Axiom Test Equipment Berkeley Nucleonics Bittele Centric RF Conduct RF Copper Mountain Technologies Empower RF everything RF Exodus Advanced Communications Innovative Power Products ISOTEC KR Filters Lotus Systems PCB Directory Rigol RF Superstore San Francisco Circuits Reactel RFCT TotalTemp Technologies Triad RF Systems Windfreak Technologies Withwave LadyBug Technologies Wireless Telecom Group Sponsorship Rates RF Cafe Software Resources Vintage Magazines Thank you for visiting RF Cafe!
DC-70 GHz RF Cables - RF Cafe

How NOT to Use Transistors
September 1959 Popular Electronics

September 1959 Popular Electronics

September 1959 Popular Electronics Cover - RF CafeTable of Contents

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from Popular Electronics, published October 1954 - April 1985. All copyrights are hereby acknowledged.

Transistors were still relatively new when these cartoons were published in the September 1959 issue of Popular Electronics magazine. Most people had never seen a transistor, much less handled one. Soldering irons used for working on the point-to-point wiring used on vacuum tube gear could also be used for soldering the old copper guttering and downspouts - at least the ones that got hot enough and had enough thermal inertia to melt solder on sheet steel chassis'. Does the guy in this General Transistor infomercial look a bit like Dilbert - or maybe I should ask does Dilbert look a bit like this guy? BTW, are you thinking what I'm thinking about the picture on the bottom left?

How NOT to Use Transistors

How Not to Use Transistors, September 1959 Popular Electronics - RF CafeCourtesy of General Transistor Corp.

We've all heard how sturdy and indestructible the transistor is ... but nothing is perfect. Any qualified engineer, equipped with the proper educational background can, with a little ingenuity, reduce the transistor to a midget jellyfish. The accompanying quips are by no means all-inclusive, but they will start you on your way to becoming a big transistor user.

 

  • Ignore the published ratings and exceed them. You'll have a real "hot" transistor - for a moment or two.

  • make contact is switched around. This may cause immediate ruin.
  • Twist and yank the leads excessively when you install the transistor. If you listen closely you will hear the snap.
  • If the transistor does not fit into the equipment properly, put a screwdriver on the case and hammer it into place.
  • Overheat the leads with a big soldering iron. Leads are going out of style anyway.
  • In order to burn out the transistor thoroughly, be sure there is leakage to the power line in the soldering iron.

 

 

Posted May 16, 2022
(updated from original post on 3/20/2012)

everythingRF RF & Microwave Parts Database (h1) - RF Cafe
Rigol DSG5000 Microwave Generator - RF Cafe
Noisecom
Exodus Advanced Communications Best in Class RF Amplifier SSPAs

Please Support RF Cafe by purchasing my  ridiculously low−priced products, all of which I created.

These Are Available for Free

 

About RF Cafe

Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe Webmaster

Copyright: 1996 - 2024

Webmaster:

    Kirt Blattenberger,

    BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The World Wide Web (Internet) was largely an unknown entity at the time and bandwidth was a scarce commodity. Dial-up modems blazed along at 14.4 kbps while tying up your telephone line, and a nice lady's voice announced "You've Got Mail" when a new message arrived...

All trademarks, copyrights, patents, and other rights of ownership to images and text used on the RF Cafe website are hereby acknowledged.

My Hobby Website:

AirplanesAndRockets.com