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MECA Electronics

The Sarasota Mystery First Follow-Up
April 1966 Popular Electronics

April 1966 Popular Electronics

April 1966 Popular Electronics Cover - RF CafeTable of Contents

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from Popular Electronics, published October 1954 - April 1985. All copyrights are hereby acknowledged.

The initial part of this article, The Sarasota Mystery, appeared in the previous issue (March). Mr. Minto is still scratching his head over hydronic communications.

The Sarasota Mystery First Follow-Up

By Ken Warner

The Sarasota Mystery First Follow-Up, April 1966 Popular Electronics - RF CafeThings have not been standing still in the mysterious world of Hydronics and Wallace Minto.

Scientists do not have a "pat" answer for the unusual underwater transmission capabilities of Hydronics. As reported in this magazine last month (page 50), a retired inventor-scientist-experimenter, Wallace L. Minto, has discovered a new method of communications, similar to sonar and radio waves, but actually identical to neither. Minto has labeled his through-water communications "Hydronics," and a somewhat similar phenomenon that seemingly defies resistance and insulation "Plasmonics."

A few weeks ago, Minto attempted and succeeded in something new - receiving the Hydronics waves out of the water when the transmitter was immersed. The circumstances surrounding this test were essentially those shown at left.

Suspended some 90 feet below the boat was a Hydronics transmitter - sealed in a waterproof canister. The radiated signal was a continuous tone and could be intercepted by the receiver on a nearby dock. The "catch" seems to have been the antenna, masked in an attaché case with a lead wire coming out the side. When the attaché case was looking end-on toward the transmitter, the tone signal could be heard loud and clear; but when the case (antenna) was rotated broadside, the signal died out.

As before, Minto was forthright in discussing his latest development: "I am aware of the basic physical laws [and] I know there is no way to account for my demonstrations. Nevertheless, my associates and I are doing these things [and] I am demonstrating facts." Minto added, "We have shown and we will continue to show any serious-minded scientist who cares to take the trouble to come and see just what we can do.

It is evident that no one-possibly not even Minto himself - fully understands just what Hydronics might become to underwater communications.

- Ken Warner

 

 

Posted March 8, 2018

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