Left Border Content - RF Cafe
RIGOL Technologies (test equipment) - RF Cafe
RF Electronics Symbols, Stencils for Office, Visio by RF Cafe
 

About RF Cafe

Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe Webmaster

Copyright: 1996 - 2024
Webmaster:
    Kirt Blattenberger,

    BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The World Wide Web (Internet) was largely an unknown entity at the time and bandwidth was a scarce commodity. Dial-up modems blazed along at 14.4 kbps while typing up your telephone line, and a nice lady's voice announced "You've Got Mail" when a new message arrived...

All trademarks, copyrights, patents, and other rights of ownership to images and text used on the RF Cafe website are hereby acknowledged.

My Hobby Website:

AirplanesAndRockets.com

Header Region - RF Cafe
Electronics World articles Popular Electronics articles QST articles Radio & TV News articles Radio-Craft articles Radio-Electronics articles Short Wave Craft articles Wireless World articles Google Search of RF Cafe website Sitemap Electronics Equations Mathematics Equations Equations physics Manufacturers & distributors Engineer Jobs LinkedIn Crosswords Engineering Humor Kirt's Cogitations RF Engineering Quizzes Notable Quotes App Notes Calculators Education Engineering magazine articles Engineering software Engineering smorgasbord RF Cafe Archives RF Cascade Workbook 2018 RF Symbols for Visio - Word Advertising RF Cafe Homepage Thank you for visiting RF Cafe!
Sub-Header - RF Cafe Anatech Electronics

Neon Blubs Show Microwave Distribution in Oven
Videos for Engineers

 - RF CafeHere is a really cool demonstration showing the distribution of microwaves inside a kitchen microwave oven. Experimenter Zeke Kossover drilled an array of holes in an acrylic panel, into which he inserted neon bulbs. Per Zeke, "Microwaves are invisible, so you can't see them inside microwave oven, but their presence can be detected with neon lamps. The changing electromagnetic field from the microwaves will make charged particles move, and so the electrons in the metal legs will move creating current. This current makes the lamps glow." You can see how the field changes as the panel rotates, and also how the presence of a substance that absorbs the energy affects the pattern.

RF Cafe - Neon Bulbs (AC & DC), image from WikipediaA typical NE-2 type neon bulb, likely used in the experiment, turns on at about 65 VAC or 90 VDC. Once the bulb starts conducting, the resistance goes down and the voltage drop across the bulb lowers by about 10 volts. The nearly constant voltage made neon bulbs useful as voltage regulators before semiconductor devices like Zener diodes became available. Since the trigger voltage is what determines when the neon begins to conduct, that explains why 65 VAC, with a peak of 65 Vrms x √2 = 92 Vpk, turns it on while 90 volts of direct current must be applied. All that need to be done to turn the bulbs on is to immerse them an electric field with an orientation sufficient to induce the trigger voltage.

Videos for Engineers - RF CafeThis archive links to the many video and audio files that have been featured on RF Cafe.

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 |
| 16 | 17 | 18 |19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 |



Posted November 23, 2010

Footer - RF Cafe Anatech Electronics
Right Border Content - RF Cafe
PCB Directory (Manufacturers)
Berkeley Nucleonics Academy - RF Cafe
 

Please Support RF Cafe by purchasing my  ridiculously low−priced products, all of which I created.

These Are Available for Free