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Philco Models 39 and 39A, 6-Tube Dual-Range Battery Superhet
Radio Service Data Sheet
May 1936 Radio-Craft

May 1936 Radio-Craft

May 1936 Radio-Craft Cover - RF Cafe[Table of Contents]

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from Radio-Craft, published 1929 - 1953. All copyrights are hereby acknowledged.

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Philco Model 39-6 Radio (RadioMuseum.org)

This is another Radio Service Data Sheet that appeared in the May 1936 edition of Radio-Craft magazine. It was a dual-band radio covering both 550-1,720 kHz and 5.500-16.000 MHz, AM and a popular shortwave band, respectively. Power input was DC only, requiring the standard pair of 67.5 V "B" cells for the high voltage, a 1.5 V (or 2.0 V) "A" cell for the vacuum tube heater elements, and a 7.5 V "C" cell for biasing. These DC radio sets were meant to service rural locations with no AC electric service. No instance of a Philco Model 39 or Model 39A could be located, but it appears numerous variations of this tabletop radio were made at around the same time. The Philco Radio Gallery shows a few of the "39" models. I post this schematic and functional description of the Philco Models 39 and 39A, 6-Tube Dual-Range Battery Superhet manufacturers' publications for the benefit of hobbyists and archivists who might be searching for such information either in a effort to restore a radio to working condition, or to collect archival information. 

Philco Models 39 and 39A, 6-Tube Dual-Range Battery Superhet

Philco Models 39 and 39A, 6-Tube Dual-Range Battery Superhet, May 1936 Radio-Craft - RF Cafe(Ranges, 550 to 1,720 kc., 5,500 to 16,000 kc.; class B output; A.V.C.; low battery drain; dynamic speaker.)

Voltages in this set are as follows:

These readings are taken with a high-resistance voltmeter, and all are measured to ground.

The model 39 is operated from a 2-V. storage cell, while the model 39A is operated from a dry "A" battery, and requires the use of a type 6 ballast tube, V7. The socket for V7 is also on the 39 chassis. but is shorted out with a jumper.

The power consumption is 19 ma. from the high-voltage supply, and 670 ma. from the filament supply.

An output meter is needed for alignment and is connected to the plate terminal of V6. Locations of all trimmers are shown in the detail drawing, with the exception of C6, which is located on the underside of the chassis. The I.F. is aligned with the dial of the receiver set at 600, and the lead from the service oscillator connected to the cap of V1. the regular grid-cap connection having been removed. With the service oscillator still set at 460 kc., and the leads connected to the antenna and ground terminals of the receiver. adjust the wavetrap condenser, C5, for minimum response. The alignment frequencies for the broadcast band are 1,500 kc. and 600 kc,

For short-wave trimming, the maker recommends the use of a special, "crystal"-type service oscillator which has a frequency of 3.6 mc. With the wave-band switch turned to the right, and the crystal oscillator connected to the antenna and ground posts of the receiver, the 4th harmonic of the service oscillator should be picked up at about halfway between 14 and 15 mc. on the receiver dial. With the dial at a little more than 7 mc. the 2nd harmonic of the crystal service oscillator will be picked up. and at this point C3 is adjusted for best response. Although an ordinary service oscillator without the crystal feature may be used on the short-wave bands, the results are not so accurate.

A detail of the battery plug is given on the main diagram. It should be noted that the "A" leads do not come out of this plug, but are brought out of the cable separately just above it. This plug is made for connection directly to the special "B" and "C" battery unit, no connection wires being need-ed.

A special, low-drain pilot lamp is used.

 

 

Posted January 8,2024
(updated from original post on 5/18/2015)


Radio Service Data Sheets

These schematics, tuning instructions, and other data are reproduced from my collection of vintage radio and electronics magazines. As back in the era, similar schematic and service info was available for purchase from sources such as SAMS Photofacts, but these printings were a no-cost bonus for readers. There are 227 Radio Service Data Sheets as of December 28, 2020.

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Copyright: 1996 - 2024

Webmaster:

    Kirt Blattenberger,

    BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The World Wide Web (Internet) was largely an unknown entity at the time and bandwidth was a scarce commodity. Dial-up modems blazed along at 14.4 kbps while tying up your telephone line, and a nice lady's voice announced "You've Got Mail" when a new message arrived...

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