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Fada 9 Tube Model 190 "Metal" All-Wave Receiver
Radio Service Data Sheet
October 1935 Radio-Craft

October 1935 Radio-Craft

October 1935 Radio Craft Cover - RF Cafe[Table of Contents]

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from Radio-Craft, published 1929 - 1953. All copyrights are hereby acknowledged.

Fada 9 Tube Model 190 (radiomuseum.org) - RF CafeThese schematics, tuning instructions, and other data are reproduced from my collection of vintage radio and electronics magazines. As back in the era, similar schematic and service info was available for purchase from sources such as SAMS Photofacts, but these printings were a no-cost bonus for readers. A Google search for a photo of the Fada Model 190 only turned up this magazine advertisement that appeared on the RadioMuseum.org website.

Fada 9 Tube Model 190 "Metal" All-Wave Receiver

FADA 9 Tube Model 190 "Metal" All-Wave Receiver, October 1935 Radio-Craft - RF Cafe(Four bands; covers 540 kc. to 24 mc. with no skips; noise suppression; automatic tone regulator; delayed A.V.C.; push-pull output with 6 watts power; 9 metal tubes; triple tuned I.F. coils.)

I.F. Adjustments

"First, disconnect the outside antenna sys­tem from the receiver. Second, disconnect the control-grid lead from the 6A8 tube. Third, connect the high-potential lead of the signal generator to the control-grid of the 6A8 tube, and the low-potential side to the receiver "ground" lead'. Fourth, place an output meter (copper-oxide type) across the speaker voice-coil. Fifth, place the signal generator in operation and adjust the carrier output to 456 kc.

Adjustment of S.-W. Band "A" Shunt Condensers

The compensators are located as indicated in the sketch. (A) Remove the signal generator connection from the control-grid of the 6A8 tube and replace the control-grid lead. (B) Connect the antenna wire of the receiver chassis through a 400 ohm carbon resistor to the high-potential side of the signal generator. Adjust the carrier output of the signal generator to 20 mc. (C) Turn the wave-band selector switch to band "A," left. Set the calibrated dial of the receiver to read 20 mc. (D) Adjust the S.-W. band "A" oscillator shunt compensator for maximum signal output. (E) Having determined the peak, and maximum setting for the S.-W. band "At oscillator shunt condenser, adjust the S.-W. band "A" R.F. stage shunt con­denser and the S.W. band "A" detector shunt condenser for maximum signal output. Turn the receiver - dial to the image point (20.9 mc.) to determine that both condensers have been adjusted to the correct peak. (F) Ad­just the carrier frequency output of the signal generator to 10 mc. (G) Turn the calibrated dial of the receiver to pick up this 10 mc. signal and check for sensitivity at this point. There is no variable oscillator series condenser at this frequency.

 

 

Posted August 24, 2017

Radio Service Data Sheets

These schematics, tuning instructions, and other data are reproduced from my collection of vintage radio and electronics magazines. As back in the era, similar schematic and service info was available for purchase from sources such as SAMS Photofacts, but these printings were a no-cost bonus for readers. There are 214 Radio Service Data Sheets as of August 24, 2017.

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